MSB September 2019

Midstream Business Magazine - September 2019

Natural gas has always has been something of the stepchild of the industry, according to editor-at-large Paul Hart. The federal government compounded the gas problem for years by mandating prices that remained artificially low, always just behind what the market would willingly pay for the fuel. Producers ignored it, and, to no surprise, gas reserves dwindled. This issue of Midstream Business lights up the topic of natural gas.

Also in this issue: 

  • The Permian Basin’s close proximity to key markets continues to attract midstream energy companies.
  • The global gas trade impacts domestic natural gas markets now more than ever.
  • The Canadian oil and gas industry has entered a phase of re-evaluation and retrenchment. Pipelines are in the middle of it all.
  • Increased North Slope drilling and production could further boost U.S. export volumes.

Cover Story

The Ins And Outs Of Gas

Problem: the need for sufficient gas pipeline capacity.

Opportunity: new customers beyond power generation and petrochemicals.

Feature

An Alaskan Oil Renaissance?

Increased North Slope drilling and production could further boost U.S. export volumes.

Bigger Market, Tougher Forecast

The global gas trade impacts domestic natural gas markets now more than ever.

Canada’s Search For Solutions

The Canadian oil and gas industry has entered a phase of re-evaluation and retrenchment. Pipelines are in the middle of it all.

Freeze!

Producing super-cold LNG requires additional natural gas pretreatment and contaminant removal.

Gas In Transition

How will the U.S. natural gas market change in the coming decades? There are two likely options.

Keeping Up With Growth

The Permian Basin’s close proximity to key markets, like the Gulf Coast and Cushing, Okla., continues to attract midstream energy companies.

Leak Detection

Too often, tragedy has to occur before industry and government personnel respond to hazards.

Navigating The Permitting Process

There are key considerations for pipeline project developers seeking the necessary government approvals before construction.

The Pipelines

The continent’s outstanding interstate gas transmission grid sustains its growing role as the world’s preeminent gas producer.

To Market, To Market

The world wants America’s LNG, but who the customers are, and where, will change.

Editor's Note

Editor's Note: Commercial Evolution Of Natural Gas

Gas proved more trouble than it was worth—literally. The answer for years proved easy: Flare it. Get rid of it.