Use Less Air Conditioning, Drive Slower to Shun Russian Energy, IEA Urges

Energy saving has long been needed to meet climate goals, but months of soaring energy prices and a scramble to cut reliance on Russian fossil fuels following Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine have pushed the issue up the political agenda.

Kate Abnett, Reuters

Raise your air conditioner’s temperature, adjust your boiler settings, drive slower and swap short-haul flights for trains: some of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) advice on how consumers can help reduce reliance on Russian energy and cut their bills.

Energy saving has long been needed to meet climate goals, but months of soaring energy prices and a scramble to cut reliance on Russian fossil fuels following Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine have pushed the issue up the political agenda.

In a guide launched with the European Commission on April 21, the Paris-based IEA recommended Europeans work from home where possible, share cars, avoid driving on Sundays in large cities, and use bikes, public transport or walk more.

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