How Wind-For-Oil Can Be An Alternative To Shore-Based Electrification

The author traveled to Aker Solutions’ Norwegian facility to discover how wind power can help reduce carbon emissions for oil production.

Equinor is already exploring the possibility of powering oil production utilizing floating offshore wind with its Hywind Tampen project for the Gullfaks and Snorre fields. (Source: Aker Solutions)

Equinor is already exploring the possibility of powering oil production utilizing floating offshore wind with its Hywind Tampen project for the Gullfaks and Snorre fields. (Source: Aker Solutions)

Offshore wind energy is not a new concept. It has been growing since the facility of Denmark's east coast began supplying power in 1991. Although that 4.95-MW facility has now been decommissioned, the offshore wind market has grown to an impressive 23 GW according to the latest figures from the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC).

However, the growth of offshore wind has come under pressure because many of the high-wind, shallow-water sites required for the current breed of offshore wind turbines are in sight of land, causing resistance from local communities. However, the demand for renewable energy and wind power, in particular, is growing, seeking developers to look further offshore into deeper waters where the wind is often stronger. The challenge here is that traditional structures fixed to the seabed are impractical, hence the advent of floating wind turbines.

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Mark Venables

Based in London, Mark Venables has covered the energy and oil and gas sectors for more than 20 years. He had edited several magazines including Oil & Gas Technology, Engineering & Technology and Power Engineer as well as contributing to national newspapers, newsstand and trade publications.