Fuel Cell Technology Makes Way For Subsea Supercharger

The technology provides untethered power with energy storage offshore.

The system’s stack design can be tailored for operation with pure oxygen. (Source: Teledyne Energy Systems)

The system’s stack design can be tailored for operation with pure oxygen. (Source: Teledyne Energy Systems)

HOUSTON— A division of Teledyne Technologies Inc., a California-headquartered conglomerate known for its arsenal of technology, has taken its fuel cell system technology originally developed for NASA applications to the sea.

Fuel cells use hydrogen, or a different fuel source, to produce electricity. Other byproducts of the chemical process, which combines hydrogen and oxygen atoms, include heat and water. While the technology has been used to provide water for astronauts in space, Teledyne Energy Systems’ Jason Foess explained, it is also being used to provide power subsea for the oil and gas sector.

Launched in 2019, Teledyne’s “subsea supercharger” provides untethered power subsea, enabling autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) to power up and serving as backup power source for offshore infrastructure.

Already have an account? Log In

Subscribe now to get unmatched and complete coverage of the Energy industry’s entire landscape!

View our subscription options
  • Access to site wide content
  • Access to our proprietary databases
  • Watch exclusive videos with energy executives
  • Unlimited access to an extensive library of Playbooks, Techbooks, Yearbooks, supplements, and special reports
  • Newly Added! Access to Rextag's Energy Datalink, containing extensive GIS databases of energy assets, production records, processing capacities, physical locations, planned projects, acquisition records, and much more.

Velda Addison

Velda Addison is the senior editor of digital media for Hart Energy’s editorial team. She covers energy with a focus on renewables.